Re: Creators one of the best anime on Prime Video

Best Hidden Gems Of Anime on Amazon Prime Video

Anime is on the rise around the world. Simply put, people are watching more anime than they’ve ever seen before. Luckily, there’s still a lot of excellent anime on most streaming platforms. It’s mostly a case of figuring them out. We’ve covered the best anime on Netflix and Hulu, so if Amazon Prime Video is one of your subscriptions, we’ve got it too. It’s never an ample forum like the others for anime, but there are three nice jewels.

Here’s the Best anime in Amazon’s prime video.

1. Inuyashiki

Inuyashiki is easily one of the greatest animes to come out in the last few years. His storytelling also exceeds that of the great American serialized television. It’s all too sweet. Right from the start, it’s a story that quickly catches your attention and lets you know that you’re watching something extraordinary. Inuyashiki is an old man whose family appears to dislike him and is utterly unappreciative of his life. One night he’s going for a stroll in the park, and some kind of alien blast shakes the place. When Inuyashiki walks in, he appears to be a super-strong robot with crazy powers. He uses his new abilities to aid those in need, and he also discovers that he can restore and put them back to life. Suddenly, Inuyashiki has a meaning in life, and seeing him reawaken straight away made me weep on a number of occasions.

2. Birdy the Mighty: DECODE

DECODE is a fairly forgotten and extremely professional sequence of acts. This revival of the ’80s series begins with a run-in between the interplanetary agent, Birdy Cephon Altera, and Tsutomu, a regular high schoolboy. Unfortunately for him, Birdy’s encounter entails blowing him out while tracking a suspect on a mission that causes the kid and Birdy to remain in the same body while attempting to restore their own. Their quirky friendship is at the heart of the sequence, but it is also decorated with exciting battles. Director Kazuki Akane, better known for the classic Escaflowne, has a knack to making the fighting look big; even though the actual size of the fight is smaller, his excellent staging that tangibly places everything in the setting makes it feel fantastic.

3. Re: Creators

Re: Creators are incredibly cool in the way that they offer strenuous, intense battle scenes, but they’re all about the challenges of production and the lack of aspirations. Sota Mizushino is an ardent manga and anime fan and wishes one day to produce a series of his own that reaches an audience. Suddenly, characters from all over the media — manga, comics, video games — are introduced to the real world, and Sota somehow becomes a middleman between two sects of inventions where the destiny of the Planet is at stake.

Re: Creators are far from the traditional “missing protagonists need to get home” plot and continue to constantly incorporate twists during the season (it also includes one of the most innovative “recap shows” you’ll ever find). The series combines existentialism with flashy battle scenes and Re: the developers produce something really daring and unforgettable in the process. In general, it’s a perfect deconstruction of the medium.

4. Grand Blue

Grand Blue is very different from the standard piece-of-life comedy: for once, it adopts a post-high school atmosphere. Iori Kitahara is preparing up his new year of college, transferring to his uncle’s scuba diving store in the seaside town of Izu, planning to embark on his dream college tour. But Kitahara’s going to join the diving club, whose founders are doing more binge partying than real diving, and his life quickly transforms into a perennial bender — you know, college stuff! Much of the parts in Grand Blue are based on alcohol, especially how Kitahara often seems to be unwittingly becoming a party life. In reality, the show is so funny that every episode is preceded by a disclaimer condemning “underage drinking” and “shameful behavior.” Notwithstanding the one-dimensional subject matter, Grand Blue has excentric, engaging characters and solid comedic timing. Expect to see a lot of half-naked guys pouring beers, too.

5. RWBY

RWBY is a Rooster Teeth anime-style show. It has the reputation of being one of the only strong animes not from Japan. The animation style takes a little time to get used to it, but the show itself is strong. It follows a squad of four hunters as they become friends, defeat the evil Grimm, and attempt to save the world. Amazon doesn’t have a single episode. However, they still have variations in the movies of each season. The series is much shorter than traditional TV programs, meaning that a single two-hour movie really spans the whole season pretty well. One to six seasons can be viewed on Amazon Prime Video.

6. Sagrada Reset

Sagrada Reset is set up in the town of Sakurada, a peculiar society where anyone who lives there has some kind of extraordinary abilities. Kei Asai, for example, has an outstanding case of photographic memory to the extent that he has not lost one event that happened to him in Sakurada. Kei finally gets into touch with Misora Haruki, who has the power to reset time for as much as three days. This is an extraordinary force, but Kei still maintains his memory of the now-deleted period through these resets. As a result, Kei and Misora are teaming up and using their abilities in unison to help out individuals and solve a much greater mystery that is afoot in Sakurada.

The relationship here between Kei and Misora is so caring and romantic, but the show also presents an intriguing universe where unusual abilities are not only normal but also controlled by a shady corporate board.

7. Pop Team Epic

Pop Team Epic is a goofy sitcom. It’s sort of like an anime version of Robot Chicken with brief sketches that make up episodes. It’s full of jokes, pop culture parodies, and stuff like that. The show centers around 14-year-old girls and the insane stuff they get into. You can tell from the preview that things get ridiculous at the show very easily. This is one of the few pure comedy anime on Amazon Prime Video. Amazon has 12 of the 14 episodes available.